Government to follow rule of law in Zakir Naik's case: Gobind Singh (Updated)

SHAH ALAM: Communications and Multimedia Minister Gobind Singh Deo said if India makes a case against controversial Muslim preacher Dr Zakir Naik which warrants him to be sent back then Malaysia has to act accordingly.

“Of course as the government, once a case is put forward, the government has to decide whether to send him back,” Gobind said at a press conference after launching the Integrated Parcel Centre (IPC) Expansion Project here today.

He also hit back at Parti Gerakan Malaysia for alleging that he and the other Indian ministers in the cabinet are not doing enough to deport the preacher.

“Gerakan should ask itself, they were in power for 61 years what did they do? They failed the people and that’s why the people rejected them,” he said.

He said that unlike the previous government, the new cabinet actually speaks up and discusses things.

“Our position is different, we speak up in cabinet meetings, we express the views of the people,” he said.

He revealed that Human Resource Minister M. Kulasegaran, Water, Land and Natural Resources Minister Dr Xavier Jayakumar and himself as Indian ministers in the cabinet had spoken about this with the prime minister.

In an earlier report Gerakan national legal and human rights bureau head Baljit Singh slammed Pakatan Harapan’s Indian leaders for being unable to keep their promises to deport Zakir which is what they vowed to do on the campaign trail of GE14.

Zakir is banned from entering Singapore and is also a "wanted man" in Bangladesh for court charges on claims of money laundering, supporting terrorist activities and inciting religious tension.

Despite these allegations, he obtained permanent residence status in Malaysia during Barisan Nasional rule, and he is also welcomed in Saudi Arabia.

He has courted controversy in Malaysia for reportedly delivering hate speeches during his talks. Zakir has denied such claims.

Mahathir has refused to bow to India's pressure to deport Zakir, citing the excuse that he did not commit any crime in Malaysia.