theSundaily.my Style http://www.thesundaily.my/sites/default/files/images/thesundaily_logo_google.png theSundaily.my Style http://www.thesundaily.my/rss/style http://www.thesundaily.my/rss/style en ASOS and boutique hotel launch travel-inspired collection for Millennials http://www.thesundaily.my/news/2017/09/23/asos-and-boutique-hotel-launch-travel-inspired-collection-millennials
ASOS x Hotel Indigo Edits has been launched to represent seven different Hotel Indigo destinations in the US, with ensembles curated by local social media influencers .

Hotel Indigo is a youth-oriented brand from InterContinental Hotels Group, designed to reflect its local neighbourhood and culture. No two Indigo hotels are alike.

The men's and women's collection total 140 pieces, and each edit has been curated to reflect the local destination.

Guests who want to fit in with the locals while staying at Hotel Indigo New York Lower East Side, for example, can find inspiration from influencer Eugenie Grey of Feral Creature who created an edit that reflects the neighbourhood's hip hop and vintage culture.

For the Hotel Indigo Los Angeles Downtown, influencer Jamie Kidd curated a collection that evokes the glamour of Old Hollywood, the roaring 20s, and speakeasy culture, with jewel-toned pieces, silver boots, and a boldly red, off-shoulder blouse.

Other destinations in the campaign include Denver, Nashville, Alexandria (VA), Savannah and El Paso. — AFP Relaxnews]]>
Style Fri, 22 Sep 2017 19:05:48 +0000 theSundaily 485547 at http://www.thesundaily.my
Theatrical, avant-garde Shanghai restaurant Ultraviolet earns three Michelin stars http://www.thesundaily.my/news/2017/09/22/theatrical-avant-garde-shanghai-restaurant-ultraviolet-earns-three-michelin-stars
In the second edition of the Michelin guide Shanghai, Ultraviolet joins T'ang Court in the exclusive three-starred club, a designation that denotes exceptional cuisine, worth the journey.

Opened in 2012, Ultraviolet elevates the dining experience to a multi-sensory, interactive form of entertainment that stretches the imagination and challenges the conventional à la carte dining model, in which dishes are presented under the same décor, and to the same music.

At a clandestine, undisclosed location, diners sign up for a conceptual experience that involves a wraparound projection system which transports guests to the Black Forest or puts them smack dab in a wintry blizzard.

To evoke the smell of the forest floor, atomizer sprays may infuse the room with the smell of soil.

During a deconstructed fish and chips course, the strains of AC/DC may blast overhead, as images of the Union Jack and a steady London rainfall appear on the 360-degree screens.

It's not the first big win for Pairet. In 2012, the French chef was named the inaugural recipient of Asia's 50 Best Restaurants awards' Lifetime Achievement Award.

Overall, a total of 129 restaurants get nods in the sophomore edition of the Michelin guide Shanghai, including 30 starred addresses.

While the two-starred club remains unchanged from the year before, five new addresses earned their first star, including Jean-Georges, another address from a French chef (Vongerichten).

Here is the full list:

THREE STARS
T'ang Court
Ultraviolet

Two Stars
8 1/2 Otto e Mezzo Bombana
Canton 8
Imperial Treasure
L'Atelier de Joël Robuchon
Yi Long Court
Yongfoo Elite

One Star
Bo Shanghai - New
Da Dong (IAPM & Park Place)
Dashu Wujie (Bund) - New
E' Fu Ren (Madam Goose)
Fu He Hui
Jade Mansion
Jean Georges - New
Jin Xuan
Kanpai Classic
Lao Zheng Xing
La Patio & La Famille (Sichuan Zhong Lu)
Lei Garden (IAPM & IFC)
PHENIX
Seventh Son
Shang-High
Sir Elly's
Tai'an Table -New
Xin Rong Ji
Yong Fu - New
Yong Yi Ting

— AFP]]>
Style Thu, 21 Sep 2017 19:03:07 +0000 theSundaily 485244 at http://www.thesundaily.my
Gucci goes like totally 80s in Milan http://www.thesundaily.my/news/2017/09/22/gucci-goes-totally-80s-milan
Michele burrowed further into his love for the bookish chic that has led the once-flagging house to white-hot success since he took creative control in 2015.

In a smoky near-darkness pierced by flashes of light, Gucci showed off a Spring/Summer 2018 collection that included plenty of large round glasses, satin, and even a striped and shiny track suit.

The idea guiding the show, according to Michele's notes, is a refusal "to turn the page and stubbornly dwelling on a narration that consolidates on the beauty of the show".

That meant a runway, best described as Atlantis on a foggy night, set among massive sculptures of some of humanity's greatest symbols including a smiling Buddha and Thoth, the long-beeked god known as Egypt's wisest.

The clothes were confident in their embrace of the past, including a satin suit trimmed in sequin stars that looked like something out of David Bowie's wardrobe.

There was also a brown three-piece suit that you could almost imagine in a faded Kodachrome photo -- except that the model wearing it had hands encrusted in rings and slick white shades.

"It requires courage to slowly linger; to stay with care," Michele's notes said.

He certainly did that and took a bow to the applause of celebrities like Salma Hayek -- whose husband Francois-Henri Pinault heads the French group Kering that owns Gucci.

The show was Gucci's first since Kering announced a pledge earlier this month to ban ultra-thin models from its brands' advertising and runways. From appearances, it seemed to have kept its word.

The power of zips

Milan kicked off with shows from smaller up-and-comers, including Japanese designer Atsushi Nakashima, who unveiled bright colours, space-agey silver ponchos, and clothing bisected with lots of shiny zips.

For Nakashima the zips are a reminder of humanity's better impulses in an uncertain time that has seen North Korea fire missiles directly over his homeland.

"This is the reason for the collection... putting together, understanding each other to have more communication," he told reporters through a translator. "We can connect with each other."

There is still plenty more to come over the next five days left of Milan's runway strutting.

Expectations are building for British talent Paul Surridge, who will on Friday show off his maiden collection since being named creative director in May of Roberto Cavalli, known for its sexy rock'n'roll attitude.

Husband-and-wife team Luke and Lucie Meier are presenting their first designs on Saturday since being tapped in April as creative leads of minimalist stalwart Jil Sander.

The Meiers, a rare married duo of co-directors, come from Dior for her and Paris-based menswear brand OAMC via iconic streetwear label Supreme for him.

Very good times, for some

"Lucie and I work together very naturally," Canadian Luke Meier told Vogue in June of his Swiss-born wife. "We have had an open dialogue about the approach to design for over 15 years and have often spoken of working together one day."

Newcomers to the Milan calendar also include the-sirius, a young Seoul-based label known for futuristic designs, which will indulge its ultramodern urge with a show Thursday on the campus of Milan's Leonardo da Vinci Museum of Science and Technology.

But it would not be fashion week in Italy's capital of clothes and accessories without the kings and queens of the multi-billion euro luxury goods industry like Fendi, Ferragamo, Versace, Moschino and Prada.

These European behemoths -- or some of them, anyway -- are seeing sales jump after years troubled by the triple whammy of a slowdown in Asia, currency volatility and customers staying at home after a string of terror attacks in Europe.

"While in the past good meant good for everyone... now the situation is very good for some and very bad for others," said Stefania Saviolo, a fashion and luxury expert at Milan's Bocconi University.

"It depends on the category, the brand, it depends on many things," she told AFP.

The rebound has been led by houses like Gucci which saw its sales in the first quarter of 2017 grow at their fastest pace in 20 years.

But the flip side is labels like Prada that just cannot seem to remember where they put the secret sauce. Prada has put some of the blame for soft sales on tourists being driven away by a strong euro. — AFP]]>
Style Thu, 21 Sep 2017 19:03:08 +0000 theSundaily 485245 at http://www.thesundaily.my
Fendi's Milan show finds a happy place in the sun http://www.thesundaily.my/news/2017/09/21/fendis-milan-show-finds-happy-place-sun
The latest designs from the veteran German designer emerged "in a swirl of Caribbean colour and flavour", as he said in his notes on the Spring/Summer 2018 collection for Fendi at Milan Fashion Week.

Superstar models Gigi Hadid and Kendall Jenner helped show off the looks to the selfie-snapping crowd that included fashion godmother Anna Wintour in the front row.

To the sounds of jungle electro, there were stripes big and small on display as well as skin peeking out from just above the hip. Fringes fanned out like palm fronds on the strap of one of the bags — which are among the accessories the house is famous for.

There was not a dour trace in the collection, which comes just over three months after the death of Carla Fendi. She was one of five sisters who inherited a small leather goods workshop that they turned into a luxury juggernaut.

Lagerfeld, who has designed collections for the house for over 50 years, has often been referred to as the sixth Fendi sibling.

On the catwalk the gauzy skirts and coats came in colours of ocean blue, seafoam green and coral pink. Pin-striped cotton skirts hugged high on the waist.

Amid all the seaside holiday vibes, Lagerfeld sent down the runway a wide denim trench coat and a brown leather dress that looked fit for a frontierswoman.

The collection also saw Fendi unveil the latest addition to the eye-wateringly expensive range of accessories that drive the company's revenues.

The Mon Tresor bag is leather with metallic pearls and the new Runway tote is transparent mesh with rattan handles.

French luxury group LVMH, which owns Fendi, said earlier this year that it was cautiously confident for 2017 after posting record results last year.

Bottom-line net profit grew by 11% to €3.98 billion and revenues were up 5% at €37.6 billion.

All eyes will be on flagging giant Prada and rebellious Moschino later Thursday when they unveil their new collection to buyers, bloggers and fashion lovers gathered in Italy's economic capital. — AFP]]>
Style Thu, 21 Sep 2017 14:26:22 +0000 theSundaily 485204 at http://www.thesundaily.my
Big Bangs theory: In Milan, Gucci goes back to the 80s http://www.thesundaily.my/news/2017/09/21/big-bangs-theory-milan-gucci-goes-back-80s
Michele burrowed further into his love for the bookish chic that has led the once-flagging house to enjoy white-hot success since he took creative control in 2015.

In a smoky near-darkness pierced by flashes of light, Gucci showed off a Spring/Summer 2018 collection that, along with fringed foreheads, had plenty of large round glasses, satin and even a striped and shiny track suit.

The idea guiding the show, according to Michele's notes, is a refusal "to turn the page and stubbornly dwelling on a narration that consolidates on the beauty of the show".

That meant a runway, best described as Atlantis on a foggy night, set among massive sculptures of some of humanity's greatest symbols including a smiling Buddha and Thoth, ancient Egypt's long-beaked god of magic and wisdom.

The clothes were confident in their embrace of the past, including a satin outfit trimmed in sequin stars that looked like something out of David Bowie's wardrobe.

There was also a brown three-piece suit that you could almost imagine in a faded Kodachrome photo – except that the model wearing it had slick white shades and hands encrusted in rings.

"It requires courage to slowly linger; to stay with care," Michele's notes said.

He certainly did that and took a bow to the applause of celebrities like Salma Hayek – whose husband Francois-Henri Pinault heads the French group Kering that owns Gucci.

The show was Gucci's first since Kering announced a pledge earlier this month to ban ultra-thin models from its brands' advertising and runways. Judging by appearances, it seems to have kept its word.

The power of zips

Milan kicked off with shows from smaller up-and-comers, including Japanese designer Atsushi Nakashima, who unveiled bright colours, space-agey silver ponchos and clothing bisected with lots of shiny zips.

For Nakashima, the zips are a reminder of humanity's better impulses in an uncertain time that has seen North Korea fire missiles directly over his homeland.

"This is the reason for the collection ... putting together, understanding each other to have more communication," he told reporters through a translator. "We can connect with each other."

Milan's opening day closed with a fresh face from China's fashion boom, Angel Chen. The product of London's prestigious Central Saint Martins College, a hub of design talent, Chen only began showing in Milan this year.

The collection she sent down the runway was prepared for the unexpected, with lots of bright yellow rainslicker-looking jackets and models wearing hoods cinched tight around their faces.

There is still plenty more to come over the next five days left of Milan's runway strutting.

Expectations are building for British talent Paul Surridge, who will on Friday show off his maiden collection since being named creative director in May of Roberto Cavalli, known for its sexy rock'n'roll attitude.

Husband-and-wife team Luke and Lucie Meier are presenting their first designs on Saturday since being tapped in April as creative leads of minimalist stalwart Jil Sander.

The Meiers, a rare married duo of co-directors, come from Dior for her and Paris-based menswear brand OAMC via iconic streetwear label Supreme for him.

Very good times, for some

"Lucie and I work together very naturally," Canadian Luke Meier told Vogue in June of his Swiss-born wife. "We have had an open dialogue about the approach to design for over 15 years and have often spoken of working together one day."

Newcomers to the Milan calendar also include the-sirius, a young Seoul-based label known for futuristic designs, which will indulge its ultramodern urge with a show Thursday on the campus of Milan's Leonardo da Vinci Museum of Science and Technology.

But it would not be fashion week in Italy's capital of clothes and accessories without the kings and queens of the multi-billion euro luxury goods industry like Fendi, Ferragamo, Versace, Moschino, and Prada.

These European behemoths – or some of them, anyway – are seeing sales jump after years troubled by the triple whammy of a slowdown in Asia, currency volatility and customers staying at home after a string of terror attacks in Europe.

The rebound has been led by houses like Gucci which saw its sales in the first quarter of 2017 grow at their fastest pace in 20 years. But the flip side is, labels like Prada that just cannot seem to remember where they put the secret sauce. — AFP]]>
Style Thu, 21 Sep 2017 03:23:19 +0000 theSundaily 484855 at http://www.thesundaily.my
Make-up artists' race against time at London Fashion Week http://www.thesundaily.my/news/2017/09/21/make-artists-race-against-time-london-fashion-week
Time is running out before Turkish designer Bora Aksu's show and the models are not yet ready to face the flashbulbs.

"We need everyone to speed up!" shouts Janeen Witherspoon, the chief make-up artist.

She is firm and authoritative but betrays no sign of nerves or stress, having been here countless times before.

The Irish Canadian, who works in the shadows to bring the magic to the catwalk, knows her job and keeps a cool head.

Hairdressers, junior make-up artists, photographers, producers, dressers, stylists, technicians and other members of the backstage team are dashing about around her.

The make-up tables bear large mirrors fringed with lightbulbs, where the models, wearing Aksu's outfits or partially undressed, sit patiently, indifferent to the whirlwind around them.

The clock is against them: they are due to present London-based Aksu's spring-summer 2018 collection in under an hour.

"We're always up against the time," Witherspoon told AFP, skilfully flying her brush across a young model's face.

"There's always a lot to do with make-up. We may have girls coming from other shows and they have a full face of make-up and we have to get that off and do the new look."

Brushes at the ready

Running a team of 10 make-up artists, Witherspoon is charged with transforming the faces of around 20 young female models about to step into the spotlights on the stage, with photographers poised, ready to send pictures flashing around the world.

In keeping with Aksu's collection, she uses a make-up style inspired by Maude Fealy, a US silent movie actress famed for her beauty.

Each model's make-up takes around 15 minutes, and besides applying it herself, Witherspoon checks and signs off on the work of each of her make-up artists.

"I'm sort of the conductor, and it's about my team and having all of them very close to me. They all understand me and they know how it works. It's about me going in and taking control," she said.

The models await their turn at a table covered in sandwiches, coffee and sweets.

"It's quite relaxing," Birthe Harms, an 18-year-old German model with blue-grey eyes and long, straight brown hair, said of getting her make-up done.

"I think about the show and try to prepare myself."

Liis-Kristiin Narska, a 17-year-old Estonian model, said she either thinks about her schoolwork or lets her mind wander while a team of six people whirl around her, some powdering her cheeks, others transforming her curly hair into an impressive mop.

"I've gotten use to it by now. At first it was super-cool to get make-up done on me.

"Now it's just regular. When it's over, it's interesting to see what the make-up artist does."

Last-minute adjustments

With the show about to start, Aksu rounds up the troops, the models queueing in single file ready to hit the stage. Leaving the tables, the make-up artists take up their palettes and continue working on the models seconds before they march out.

Noses, cheeks, lips, foreheads, eyelids, eyelashes, and even arms and legs are all double-checked and re-touched if necessary.

When the house lights go down, the make-up team uses special lamps to keep on working.

"We're just perfecting the looks," said Claudia Savage, 32, one of the team.

"We're looking at anything that needs to be taken down or powered; any imperfections that weren't spotted in the initial make-up," she said, revelling in the intensity of the last-minute adjustments.

"It's very exciting. It can be tough but it's enjoyable.

"It's adventurous, it's creative, it's fun. It can be very stressful at times and very challenging. But to do a job that you love, you don't feel like working."

Right on time, the show starts. And the make-up team can breathe at last. Mission accomplished. — AFP Relaxnews]]>
Style Wed, 20 Sep 2017 19:03:06 +0000 theSundaily 484687 at http://www.thesundaily.my
Burned-out French chef gives back Michelin stars http://www.thesundaily.my/news/2017/09/20/burned-out-french-chef-gives-back-michelin-stars
Sebastien Bras's Le Suquet restaurant in the village of Laguiole joined the elite club of French three-star restaurants, which currently number 27, in 1999.

On Wednesday the 46-year-old said he wanted to be dropped from the 2018 edition of the Michelin Guide to "start a new chapter".

While winning the coveted distinction had been "a source of a lot of satisfaction", maintaining its exacting standards had also put him under "huge pressure", he told AFP.

"You're inspected two or three times a year, you never know when. Every meal that goes out could be inspected. That means that, every day, one of the 500 meals that leaves the kitchen could be judged."

"Maybe I will be less famous but I accept that," he said, adding that he would continue to dazzle diners' palates "without wondering whether my creations will appeal to Michelin's inspectors".

Michelin said it was the first time a French chef had asked to be dropped from its gastronomic bible in this way, without a major change of positioning or business model.

"We note and we respect it," Claire Dorland Clauzel, a member of the French tyre maker's executive committee, said of his decision.

But she said the request would not lead to Le Suquet's "automatic" removal from the list, and would have be given due consideration.

Bras, who took over the business from his father a decade ago, said that like "all chefs" he sometimes found himself thinking of Bernard Loiseau — the Frenchman who committed suicide in 2003, an act widely seen as linked to rumours that he would lose his third Michelin star.

But "I'm not in the frame of mind," he hastened to add.

Stars no more

Bras is not the first chef to walk away from the ultra-competitive world of Michelin-star cooking.

A handful of French restaurateurs have relinquished their prized three-star status.

In 2005, late Paris restaurateur Alain Senderens — one of the pioneers of Nouvelle Cuisine — caused shock by giving back his stars, claiming that diners were turned off by excessive luxury.

He later reopened the restaurant under another name, with a simpler menu at a fraction of his old prices.

In 2008, Olivier Roellinger closed his luxury eatery in the Breton fishing village of Cancale, saying he wanted a quieter life.

Asked about the stress endured by star chefs, Dorland Clauzel likened them to top athletes.

"Excellence requires discipline and work," she said.

"We tell our chefs, 'You're not working for the Michelin Guide, you're working for your customers'." — AFP]]>
Style Wed, 20 Sep 2017 15:40:02 +0000 theSundaily 484665 at http://www.thesundaily.my
'Seismic' street-art icon Basquiat gets major UK show http://www.thesundaily.my/news/2017/09/20/seismic-street-art-icon-basquiat-gets-major-uk-show
The former graffiti artist, who died in 1988 at just 27 years old, mined a huge range of influences including jazz, pop culture, abstract and primitive art and old masters in producing his dynamic and distinctive paintings, earning him a devout legion of supporters.

"These works are able to induce almost maniacal passion in people, once you get hooked there's no going back," said Eleanor Nairne, curator at Barbican Art Gallery, where the exhibition will open on Thursday.

"His work is really expressive, loose, free," she said. "Very rough and ready, but with that raw texture to it, teeming with thoughts, influences."

His "Untitled" work sold for a record US$110.5 million (RM462.7 million) in New York this year, a sign of the increasingly high esteem in which his work is held.

The vibrant, busy pieces reveal a stream of conciousness, absorbing influences from high and pop culture, including jazz master Charlie Parker, Leonardo da Vinci, Henri Matisse and the Looney Tunes's Road Runner and reproducing them in abstract forms.

Common motifs include the use of symbols and text, often repeated in blocks, exploring themes such as colonialism and class politics.

'Beginning of information age'

Nairne said Basquiat had a "seismic impact not just on contemporary art, but much more broadly, in fashion and in media, whether it be Jay Z or Banksy."

Basquiat, born in 1960, learned his trade in the late 1970s in the post-punk underground art scene in downtown New York, being a protege of pop-art icon Andy Warhol and becoming a pioneer of multi-media work.

He also played in a band as part of the scene that spawned artists such as Blondie and the Ramones, and his use of chopped-up samples in his paintings echoed similar techniques being used at the same time by hip-hop pioneers like Grandmaster Flash.

"This is an artist who has this insatiable appetite for information," said Nairne. "We might think of this as the beginning of the information age."

"He always had the television on in the studio, always had books spread open and music playing. He was able to sample from a lot of material."

Since his death of a heroin overdose, Basquiat has had little exposure in Britain.

The Barbican Centre worked with international museums and private collections for three years to secure more than 100 works, from vast paintings like "King of Zulu" to handwritten poems influenced by beat poet William S. Burroughs.

British graffiti artist Banksy counts himself one of Basquiat's biggest fans, and caused a stir by producing two new works close to the Barbican, one pointing out the irony of holding the show in a neighbourhood largely devoid of street art.

Among those coming to survey Banksy's latest works were Sharon De Boos and her young daughter Elise.

"I wanted to show my daughter, she's never heard of Banksy so I though I'd show her, it's something different," De Boos said. — AFP]]>
Style Wed, 20 Sep 2017 15:32:24 +0000 theSundaily 484661 at http://www.thesundaily.my
London Fashion Week brings back the center part http://www.thesundaily.my/news/2017/09/20/london-fashion-week-brings-back-center-part
Sleek and straight
Julien Macdonald, Roksanda and Jasper Conran were just three of the fashion greats to declare loose, poker-straight tresses the go-to hair trend of Spring 2018. The Julien Macdonald show offered up a masterclass in sleek, shiny blow dries with just the right amount of volume, while the models at Roksanda wore their styles flatter and tucked behind the ears. Things were a little more tousled and laid-back at Jasper Conran.

Pinned back
A center parting is an easy way to elevate simple updos, as both Emilia Wickstead and Burberry proved with their on-trend low ponytails. While the models at Emilia Wickstead sported slightly tousled styles, the Burberry look, with its faintly crooked parting and loose baby hairs, gave the overall effect a back-to-school edge.

Textured
Christopher Kane and Paula Knorr added texture to the look, by keeping things damp and frizzy. Kane's models had their hair pulled tightly back into a ponytail, while some of the models at Paula Knorr sported slicked-down roots with drier ends. — AFP Relaxnews]]>
Style Wed, 20 Sep 2017 07:38:04 +0000 theSundaily 484421 at http://www.thesundaily.my
London Fashion Week brings back the center part http://www.thesundaily.my/news/2017/09/20/london-fashion-week-brings-back-center-part-0
Sleek and straight
Julien Macdonald, Roksanda and Jasper Conran were just three of the fashion greats to declare loose, poker-straight tresses the go-to hair trend of Spring 2018. The Julien Macdonald show offered up a masterclass in sleek, shiny blow dries with just the right amount of volume, while the models at Roksanda wore their styles flatter and tucked behind the ears. Things were a little more tousled and laid-back at Jasper Conran.

Pinned back
A center parting is an easy way to elevate simple updos, as both Emilia Wickstead and Burberry proved with their on-trend low ponytails. While the models at Emilia Wickstead sported slightly tousled styles, the Burberry look, with its faintly crooked parting and loose baby hairs, gave the overall effect a back-to-school edge.

Textured
Christopher Kane and Paula Knorr added texture to the look, by keeping things damp and frizzy. Kane's models had their hair pulled tightly back into a ponytail, while some of the models at Paula Knorr sported slicked-down roots with drier ends. — AFP Relaxnews]]>
Style Wed, 20 Sep 2017 07:49:00 +0000 theSundaily 484426 at http://www.thesundaily.my