No need for ‘lese majeste’ laws in Malaysia: Muhyiddin

01 Apr 2019 / 16:36 H.

KUALA LUMPUR: There is no necessity for Malaysia to have ‘lese majeste’ laws like in Thailand to protect the sanctity of the royal institution against insults and attacks by irresponsible parties, according to Home Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin (pix).

He said the reason was that the existing laws were adequate for action to be taken against those involved.

The Pakatan Harapan (PH) government has not discussed the need for such a law like in Thailand, he told the Dewan Rakyat today.

He was responding to a question from Ramli Mohd Nor (BN-Cameron Highlands) on whether the government would introduce a new law like the Lese Majeste in Thailand to curb insults against the royal institution.

However, Muhyiddin said provisions in the Sedition Act 1948 would be studied with a view for offences on insulting the royal institution to be placed under the Penal Code.

He said the matter would be discussed by the Cabinet.

Meanwhile, Muhyiddin said the Royal Malaysia Police (PDRM) had investigated 97 cases involving social media users for allegedly insulting the Malay rulers and the Yang di-Pertuan Agong from 2012 until this past March 29, with 11 of them having been charged in the court under the Sedition Act 1948 or the Communications and Multimedia Act 1998.

He said various measures had been taken to educate the public, including through awareness campaigns on the need for sensitivity when making remarks touching on religion, race and royalty.

Monitoring and investigating units on social media abuse were also set up at the police contingent and district level, he added.

He said the ministry would not compromise on any form of threats and acts by any quarters to disrupt peace enjoyed by the people. — Bernama

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