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Covid-19: No evacuation flights planned for US citizens in Malaysia

18 Apr 2020 / 10:32 H.

KUALA LUMPUR: The United States (US) government does not anticipate arranging repatriation flights for its citizens in Malaysia at this moment amid the ongoing Covid-19 outbreak as commercial flights remain a viable option, says a spokesperson from the US Embassy in Malaysia.

The spokesperson said US citizens who wish to return home should make commercial arrangements as soon as possible unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite period.

“We are thankful that commercial flights remain an option, though very limited for US citizens wishing to depart Malaysia.

“As commercial flights remain a viable option for US citizens, evacuation flights are not planned at this time for Malaysia,” the spokesperson said in a reply statement to Bernama.

When asked on the compliance level of the US citizens in adhering to the ongoing Movement Control Order (MCO) in Malaysia which is extended until April 28, the spokesperson said US citizens are subject to local laws and regulations while visiting or living in Malaysia.

Commenting on the Malaysian government and the authorities’ cooperation in facilitating the request to bring US citizens back home, the spokesperson said: “We have a longstanding, comprehensive partnership with Malaysia that extends beyond 60 years.

“We truly appreciate Malaysia’s continued support to Americans and the US embassy during these challenging times.

The spokesperson said over the past several weeks, the State Department has undertaken a worldwide effort to repatriate American citizens from around the globe.

“It’s one of the most remarkable diplomatic missions in American history.

“Globally, our team, working at great personal risk, has repatriated about 60,000 citizens from across the world through nearly 500 flights from more than 100 countries,” said the spokesperson.

For any emergency or queries, US citizens in Malaysia may contact 60-3-2168-5000 or email klacs@state.gov. - Bernama

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